Friday, August 4, 2017

Throwback Friday: The Ruby in the Smoke by Philip Pullman


This summer we'll be highlighting some of our older faves that you might have missed.Today Maria shares one of her all time favorites:



The Ruby in the Smoke by Philip Pullman
 

On a cold, fretful afternoon in early October, 1872, a hansom cab drew up outside the offices of Lockhart and Selby, Shipping Agents, in the financial heart of London, and a young girl got out and paid the driver.

She was a person of sixteen or so--alone, and uncommonly pretty. She was slender and pale, and dressed in mourning, with a black bonnet under which she tucked back a straying twist of blond hair that the wind had teased loose. She had unusually dark brown eyes for one so fair. Her name was Sally Lockhart; and within fifteen minutes, she was going to kill a man.



This is the beginning of The Ruby in the Smoke and I don't know how you can read that section and not immediately want to dive into it!
This is one of the best historical novels ever.  You have Victorian London, a spunky teen, romance, intrigue, murder, in other words a great mystery.  And once you are finished you can go to its sequels, for this is the first of a quartet (granted that I think it should only have been a trio for #4 is more of a companion not a true sequel, in my opinion).

Sally’s father is dead and Sally is suspicious about the circumstances around his death.  He was a successful businessman yet her inheritance is not what it should be.  She decides to investigate and that she does.  Here is a heroine that doesn’t know much about French literature, but she knows about ledgers, numbers, stocks and she sets up her business in London, something unheard of at the time.

You will fall in love with Sally, guaranteed!

More to read:


What Do You Mean You Never Read the Sally Lockhart Trilogy by Philip Pullman?

Friday Getaway Read: His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman

Fandom Fridays: Hey Marshmallows, it's Veronica Mars

Golden Compass Movie ... Thoughts?

 

 





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