Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Alex Awards- Taking Back the Adult Shelves

Another award that was given out on Monday was the Alex Award. You can check out some of our guesses for what would win this award here, unfortunately, we didn't do too well. But, that only means there are ten brand new to you adult titles that ALA believes teens might be interested in.

Or, to use their words, "The Alex Awards are given to ten books written for adults that have special appeal to young adults, ages 12 through 18"

This year's crop looks pretty amazing, take a look:

Big Girl Small by Rachel DeWoskin
With a singing voice that can shake an auditorium, Judy should be the star of Darcy Academy, the local performing arts high school. So why is a girl this promising hiding out in a seedy motel room on the edge of town? A scathingly funny and moving book about dreams and reality, at once light on its feet and profound. 



Inzanesville
by Jo Ann Beard

With dry wit and piercing observation, Beard writes about the relationship between two teenage girls in the 1970s--misfits whose friendship is tested by their families' claims on them, by a clique of popular girls, and by the first startling, subversive intimations of womanhood. 


The Lover's Dictionary by David LevithanYA author Levithan (Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist) enters the adult market with a novel posing as a dictionary. Written from the perspective of a man in an unnamed couple, each entry, from "aberrant" to "zenith," defines a word within the context of their relationship. The entries follow the couple from their online meeting forward into cohabitation.


The New Kids : big dreams and brave journeys at a high school for immigrant teens by Brooke Hauser
Freelance writer Hauser tracks the staff and students at the International High School at Prospect Heights in Brooklyn, N.Y., providing their personal histories as well as their day-to-day experiences.Some walked across deserts and mountains to get here. Others flew in on planes. One arrived after escaping in a suitcase. And some won't say how they got here. These are "the new kids:" new to America and all the routines and rituals of an American high school, from lonely first days to prom.


The Night Circus by Erin MorgensternThe circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des R'ves, and it is only open at night. But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway:a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them, this is a game in which only one can be left standing, and the circus is but the stage for a remarkable battle of imagination and will.


Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
Young Wade Watts takes refuge in the OASIS, the "globally networked virtual reality" that nearly all of humanity relies on. It's 2044, the year before the Singularity futurist Ray Kurzweil predicts will inextricably unite humans and computers. Life on earth is bleak and sinister, thanks to failure to avert global warming and the oil crisis. An orphan, Wade lives in the Stacks, a vast slum comprising trailers piled in precarious towers, but keeps to his hideout, where he attends school online, plays video games, and sends his avatar, Parzival, to visit with Aech, his only friend.


Robopocalypse by Daniel H. Wilson


In the near future, at a moment that no one will notice, all the dazzling technology that runs our world will unite and turn against us. "Robopocalypse" is a brilliantly conceived action-filled epic, a terrifying story with heart-stopping implications for the real technology all around us


Salvage The Bones by Jesmyn Ward
A big-hearted novel about familial love and community against all odds and a wrenching look at the lonesome, brutal, and restrictive realities of rural poverty, "Salvage the Bones" is revelatory, real, and muscled with poetry


Scrapbook of Frankie Pratt by Caroline Preston
For her graduation from high school in 1920, Frankie Pratt receives a scrapbook and her father's old Corona typewriter. Despite Frankie's dreams of becoming a writer, she must forgo a college scholarship to help her widowed mother. But when a mysterious Captain James sweeps her off her feet, her mother finds a way to protect Frankie from the less-than-noble intentions of her unsuitable beau. Through a kaleidoscopic array of vintage postcards, letters, magazine ads, ticket stubs, catalog pages, fabric swatches, candy wrappers, fashion spreads, menus, and more, we meet and follow Frankie on her journey in search of success and love

The Talk-Funny Girl by Roland Merullo


Raised by parents so intentionally isolated that they speak their own hybrid dialect, abused youth Marjorie witnesses her parents' submission to a sadistic cult leader before she is rescued by another abuse survivor who teaches her stoneworking skills

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