Monday, October 16, 2017

Middle School Monday: Well, That was Awkward by Rachel Vail


Well, That was Awkward by Rachel Vail

Gracie is the friend who always has a smile for you. She's the one who has a quick joke and a funny story. Somehow, she's also the one who has been roped into asking A.J.'s best friend, Emmett, who A.J. likes - not because Gracie wants to know... No, it's because her sometimes friend, Riley has asked her find out if A.J is harboring a crush on Riley.   Gracie sends the text to Emmet because that's what friends do, right? Even though Gracie might have a crush on smart, basketball loving A.J. too...

When Gracie gets an answer from Emmett, it's not the one that Riley was hoping for. And suddenly Gracie's in the middle of a ton of group texting drama! Gracie just wants to smooth things over and avoid conflict at all costs. That's what she does at home with her parents and it normally works with her friends too. But, when smoothing things out means keeping secrets from A.J, Emmett and her best friend, Sienna, is it worth it and can Gracie keep all those secrets straight?

This is a fun and humorous look at the tangled web of middle school friendships and relationships. Even those of us who relied on passing folded notes to communicate with friends will know exactly what’s going on.

More to read:

Middle School Monday: Awkward by Svetlana Chmakova

Middle School Monday: Mango Delight by Fracaswell Hyman

Middle School Monday: Drama by Raina Telgemeier

Middle School Monday: The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Pérez

Middle School Monday: Frazzled: Everyday Disasters and Impending Doom by Booki Vivat



Friday, October 13, 2017

Quick Pick Friday: Get a Jump on Your Weekend Reading


Sometimes all you need to figure out your next great read is a tiny taste. Here are some quick picks from our librarians:

Jennie:
Bubonic Panic by Gail Jarrow
A harrowing and riveting look at what happened when San Francisco got the plague, and politics and science collided.

Librarian M:
Scythe by Neal Shusterman
In the future no one dies naturally, but the population still needs to be culled. Two teens are apprenticed to a Scythe and learn how to glean people. Full of moral questions, this book is also a thriller with opposing factions, mass gleanings, and globe-trotting adventure.


Megan:
Ask the Passengers by A.S. King (see more posts here)
With no one to confide in, Astrid tells her secrets to the passengers of passing planes. The problem with her confidants not knowing she's there is that there's no one to advise Astrid about navigating her increasingly complex relationships, including a secret romance.





Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Always Available: New E-Audio from Hoopla


Did you know that with your Arlington Public Library card, you have access to lots of cool new audiobooks that you can play from your computer or your mobile device? We have them from several vendors, but today we're going to highlight a few that are always available once you've downloaded the Hoopla App or visited the collection through our website.


These are available today! Grab a pair of headphones and download one!

All descriptions are from the catalog:


Replica by Lauren Oliver
From Lauren Oliver, New York Times bestselling author of Before I Fall and the Delirium trilogy, comes an epic, masterful novel that explores issues of individuality, identity, and humanity. Replica contains two narratives in one: Lyra’s story and Gemma’s story. The stories can be read separately, one after the other, or in alternating chapters. The two distinct parts of this astonishing novel combine to produce an unforgettable journey.



Shadowhouse Fall by Daniel José Older
Sierra and her friends love their new lives as shadowshapers, making art and creating change with the spirits of Brooklyn. Then Sierra receives a strange card depicting a beast called the Hound of Light -- an image from the enigmatic, influential Deck of Worlds. The shadowshapers know their next battle has arrived.

Thrust into an ancient struggle with enemies old and new, Sierra and Shadowhouse are determined to win. Revolution is brewing in the real world as well, as the shadowshapers lead the fight against systems that oppress their community. To protect her family and friends in every sphere, Sierra must take down the Hound and master the Deck of Worlds . . . or risk losing them all.



All About Mia by Lisa Williamson
"That girl is such a mess." "Why can't she be like her sisters?"Blah, blah, blah. That's all Mia Campbell-Richardson ever hears. From her parents, her teachers, and her never-do-wrong older sister, Grace. So what if she parties too hard and studies too little? Who cares if she tends to end up with the wrong guys or says the wrong things at the wrong times? She's still a good friend (except when she isn't). And she still knows the way things should go (except when they don't).When Grace comes home with shocking news, Mia hopes that it's finally Grace's turn to get into trouble. But instead it's Mia whose life spirals out of control.

Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake
In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions.

But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. And it’s not just a game of win or lose…it’s life or death. The night the sisters turn sixteen, the battle begins. The last queen standing gets the crown.

Monday, October 2, 2017

Middle School Monday: The Stars Beneath Our Feet by David Barclay Moore



 
A new book that Librarian M thinks will be one of the big hits of this fall:

The Stars Beneath Our Feet by David Barclay Moore

Lolly has had a tough time ever since his brother was murdered. He finds building with Legos soothing and his Lego city soon outgrows his Harlem apartment with help of trash bags full of blocks from his mother’s girlfriend. Luckily, the head of his after-school program, Mr. Ali, lets him use an empty storage base to continue letting his imagination run wild.

Everything is going okay until Mr. Ali lets another student, Rose, use the storage space as well. She even starts building with Lolly’s Legos. On top of this intrusion into his space Lolly also has to deal with some local boys who are harassing him. Things get precarious, but luckily Lolly has lots of people in his life that look out for him and help steer him right.

Read this book if you want to spend some time with a lovely, introspective boy getting through a period of mourning and coming out stronger and wiser.

More to read:

 Up and Coming: The Boy in the Black Suit by Jason Reynolds


Middle School Monday: Soar by Joan Bauer


Friday, September 29, 2017

Quick Pick Friday: Get a Jump on Your Weekend Reading



Sometimes all you need to figure out your next great read is a tiny taste. Here are some quick picks from our librarians:

Megan:
Croak by Gina DAmico
16-year-old Lex's family is fed up with her and are sending her to live with her Uncle Mort for the summer. What Lex isn't expecting is for Mort to teach her the family business and turn her into the Grim

Katelyn:
Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia
A must read for anyone into fandom and webcomics, and who finds life and friendship online more comfortable than in person.

Nico:
Fake I.D. by Lamar Giles (see our full review here)
Nick's family is part of the witness protection program, but instead of safety, he finds a murderer loose in his new town. A non-stop thriller for teens!

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

My Lady Jane by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows

My Lady Jane  by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows

Do you know the story of Lady Jane Grey? She reigned as queen for nine days before losing her head. It doesn't seem like the basis for a fun historical romp, but the authors of My Lady Jane are here to tell Jane's story the way it should have gone down, with an extra dose of romance and a little bit of magic.

In the hands of these authors, England has been ruled until recently by Henry the VIII, a king who was not only famous for marrying repeatedly, but also because one day he turned into a lion in front of his entire court and ate a jester. Now his son, Edward is in power and the country is not entirely behind a family where some of the people turn into animals at the drop of a hat. Add to that the fact that he's probably dying and Edward does not feel great about his chances of keeping his throne.

When his advisers tell the king to create a new line of succession to the throne by trying to guarantee that the future son of his friend and cousin, Lady Jane, will be the next king, even though Jane isn't married or pregnant, Edward sets off a chain of events that throws Jane into the cross-hairs of royalty.
This is a life that bookish, feisty and opinionated Jane didn't expect or want. And then there's that whole marriage and baby part!

This is a hilarious and magical retelling of an adventurous life that was denied Jane in real history. Plus, the authors sometimes step in to chat with the reader, which gives this novel a very Princess Bride feeling. And if you enjoy My Lady Jane, the authors are going to be retelling the stories of other historical Janes as well!

More to read:

Top 5 in 2017: Katie's Faves

Teen Reviewer: The Princess Bride by William Goldman

Up and Coming: The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee



Monday, September 18, 2017

Middle School Monday: The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Pérez


Middle School Monday:  The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Pérez

Malú is not at all excited that her professor mom is moving her to Chicago for two years. She'll be starting a new school for seventh grade and she's 1,000 miles away from her dad, her dog and her favorite place to hang out -- her dad's record shop. Plus there's the fact that her mother seems to be disappointed that María Luisa (that's her full name, just don't call her that if you're not her mom, or trying to annoy her) doesn't dress like a senorita or care about much besides punk music and making zines.

When the first day goes terribly (complete with having some words with one of the most popular girls in school and a dress-code violation), it seems like this is going to be a very long two years for Malú. But, punk is not about giving up, and neither is Malú! She starts to make a few friends at school, including Joe, a boy who also violated dress code on the first day with his formerly blue hair. When she sees her nemesis signing up for the school talent show, she seizes the moment and signs her new friends up as a band. Now the only thing to do? Start a band!

Malú is unabashedly herself and in The First Rule of Punk, she is looking for the friends and places where she can be who is she is and not have to worry or care about what others will think. It's a tough thing to do in seventh grade, especially when people are calling her a "coconut" and the administration at her middle school is seriously anti-punk, but with the support of her new friends, her dad, and even her sometimes disapproving mom, she is up to the challenge.

Malú is a shining light of awesomeness and you will be happy you've had the chance to hang out with her for a while.



More to read:

Middle School Monday: Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson

Middle School Monday: Awkward by Svetlana Chmakova

Middle School Monday: Frazzled: Everyday Disasters and Impending Doom by Booki Vivat